Category: Research

Update on Empirical Test of Serial Diverse Imagining (The Cognitive Shuffle) at MacEwan University and Simon Fraser University

Prof. Digdon and her team, of the Psychology Department of MacEwan University (Edmonton Alberta), and Dr. Beaudoin (of Cognitive Science and of Education at Simon Fraser University, and of CogSci Apps Corp.) have recently completed a study of the effectiveness

When Not to Talk About the Importance of Sleep!

One afternoon last week, I received a call from a radio station asking me if I would agree to be interviewed by them at 6:00 AM the next morning to discuss “The Importance of Sleep”.

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Are Nice People More Susceptible to Insomnia than Callous People?

Are nice people more susceptible to insomnia? Recent research may have implications for this question, which until recently was rarely previously asked. Callous? Unemotional? Chances are you won’t be losing any sleep over it

Poster Presentation on Sleep Onset and Insomnia

One of the interesting things about the somnolent information processing theory is that it combines research from many different disciplines and areas of cognitive science. As such, it’s important to try to keep abreast of a wide variety of cognitive science research.

Dr. Sylwia Hyniewska —Affective Scientist on Board of Advisors

CogSci Apps benefits from its collaborations with several researchers. Some of our advisors are listed on the CogZest Advisory Board web page. In this post, we would like to acknowledge the contribution of Dr. Sylwia Hyniewska.

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Perturbance: An Important Concept for Understanding “Racing Minds” and Other Forms of Repetitive Thinking

My colleagues and I recently published a paper that provides one of the essential concepts for understanding insomnia and a host of other constructive, banal, and problematic mental states. The concept is perturbance, which is a persistent tendency to consider

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Preliminary Results of a Study Comparing The Cognitive Shuffle with Backward Counting (Like “Counting Sheep”)

Researchers at the University of Montreal will present a paper in Montreal comparing the cognitive shuffle with backward counting. This research was undertaken for several reasons, one of which is that insomnia research has to date assessed surprisingly few deliberate

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Today at CogSci 2015 in Pasadena—The First Public Empirical Research Data on the Cognitive Shuffle / Serial Diverse Imagining (Digdon & Beaudoin)

Today (July 24, 2015) at the CogSci 2015 Conference in Pasadena, California, we will be presenting the first set of preliminary data on the technique used by mySleepButton: serial diverse imagining, which is a form of cognitive shuffle. The data

Comments on Summaries of Ellis, Cushing, Germain (2015) “one-shot” CBT-I

A study published June 1, 2015, on the benefits of a single-shot of CBT-I (Ellis, Cushing, Germain, 2015 has received a lot of media attention and generated considerable discussion. The controversy (including a reddit thread with over 1,000 comments, and

Why Ruminating Delays Sleep. And How to Stop Ruminating at Bedtime

In this blog post, I examine one of the most common psychological reasons why people can’t fall asleep: Rumination. And I discuss what you can do about it. Ruminating means to persist in hashing out a concern in one’s head,

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